The Process

A few things about the gear in general and the process

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Everything is made in house. From the silk-screening to the 99.9% point to point wiring (small PCB on the headphone amp is currently the only exception) fully hand assembled, and then checked in my studio.

Once you place an order, you’re issued a serial number for each piece of gear and it is then put into the cue for assembly. Normally, a roughly 4 to 5 week turn around between placing the order and shipment is expected, although currently the line is a little longer because of the large response to our recent launch.  I recommend contacting me, as it could be shorter or longer depending on the current bench lineup. Most common parts I keep stockpiled in the workshop, but some parts, especially those in the Wooly Mammoth are sourced from all corners of the globe (Britain, Germany, Russia, Asia, and the Ukraine for example) and sometimes take longer to receive when stock is needed. I’ve found myself at the whim of transformer manufactures and their short supply of cores a few times now (Thanks Dave at Cinemag for coming through in a pinch when needed).

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Another thing to keep in mind is that yes, I even do all the paint and drill work. Instead of just ordering a big batch from an over-seas plant, I paint, silkscreen and drill out each casing in my shop on small hand operated equipment. I take pride in doing it this way. Does it take a million times longer? Painstakingly, Yes! But to me it’s worth it. Hopefully you will feel the same when it arrives at your door and even more so when you use it in your studio.

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Because nothing is made on an assembly line or by an automated machine, you may often see small variances or I dare say tiny imperfections in things like paint or graphics.  By this, I mean the tiniest of things, but just the effects of everything being hand made.  Maybe the edge of a letter is just a little hazy or something to that effect.  I am a perfectionist most of the time, but sometimes if the imperfection is small enough, it just adds to the retro vibed visual effect.

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